Magazine article Insight on the News

A Civil-Rights Movement to Save Children Is Key to Ending the Scourge of Abortion

Magazine article Insight on the News

A Civil-Rights Movement to Save Children Is Key to Ending the Scourge of Abortion

Article excerpt

History proves there is a correlation between the legalization of abortion and the legalization of slavery in America. Both involved the right of one person over that of the other, and both are fueled by desires for financial gain. However, in contrast to the abortion era, the black population in America increased during the period of slavery. Legal abortion has reduced the African-American community by more than 4 percent.

Both the right of a slave owner to choose to own slaves and the right of a mother to choose to abort her child can be traced back to decisions handed down by the U.S. Supreme Court. These decisions were based on the political desires of national leaders to separate the physical humanity of a targeted group from their legal personhood -- either out of eugenic intent or simply to make a profit. Keep in mind that, if slavery had not been profitable, it would not have been tolerated.

Just as the rich landowners lobbied Congress and the Supreme Court to keep slavery legal, so too the $90 billion abortion industry lobbies for abortion to be available on demand and subsidized with tax dollars. In both situations a group of people have been singled out and stripped of their personhood, leaving them as chattel whose destinies lay at the whim of others.

When the right to own slaves was legally upheld, abolitionists worked tirelessly to show that this was morally wrong. Many among the educated elite admonished the abolitionists for imposing on others their own moral repudiation of slavery. It was the popular consensus that free people could decide for themselves -- i.e., make a choice -- whether to own slaves. The general public (that is, free people) felt that since slavery was legal, no one had a right to interfere in a slave owner's right to acquire, maintain, handle, treat or dispose of his own property. Abolitionists were considered religious zealots and Christian fanatics.

Standing up for human and civil rights of people of African descent earned abolitionists social rejection, personal ridicule and violent retaliation. They were not deterred, however, knowing as they did that just because an activity is legal doesn't make it right. Abolitionists knew that just because Supreme Court justices and governmental leaders refused to consider a person's inalienable right to life -- ignoring the humanity of a beating heart -- doesn't give anyone the right to torture and kill another human. …

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