Magazine article Sunset

Useful Tricks Your Hose Can Play ... with the Right Nozzles

Magazine article Sunset

Useful Tricks Your Hose Can Play ... with the Right Nozzles

Article excerpt

Useful tricks your hose can play...with the right nozzles

Use them to water more carefully, more efficiently When water problems grow, water districts often ask customers to switch from sprinkler watering to hose watering. Each device pictured here is made to go onto the end of a hose, and each affects either how much water comes out or how it's delivered. We show nozzles (including the related bubbler), valves, and the hoses they fit on. Expect to pay $2 to $13 for most nozzles and valves, up to $20 for the wand nozzle. There's an old one-hole brass nozzle in almost everybody's garage. And, though you can adjust it to deliver a mist, jet, or stream and even shut water off, it's probably not as efficient as these others for watering plants, because it delivers water too fast or too slowly. For day-to-day garden use, you're better off with a nozzle designed for the purpose.

Tricks your nozzle should know For hand-watering, get a nozzle that breaks water into rain-size droplets that don't wash soil away as they fall. Some of these nozzles are fan-shaped, others are round, but almost all pass water through a rose (a perforated cap) to break water up. An exception: the trigger nozzle passes water through something that may remind you of a turbine. The best nozzles have built-in flow and spray pattern adjustments. Watering wands help you put water exactly where you want it. They're especially useful for watering hanging baskets and densely planted pots. For basin or row irrigation, use a bubbler. Bubblers, like many nozzles, usually come without built-in on-off valves. Such valves save on the water you'd normally waste on the walk between hose bibb and watering spot; they're easy to add on.

Four kinds of hose-end valves You're already familiar with gate valves: one is probably on your hose bibb. They're nice because they can tune the water's flow so finely. As you shop for one to put on the far end of your hose, remember that gate valves come with either pipe threads or hose threads; you want hose threads. Inexpensive thumb valves are sold in plastic or brass at nurseries and garden centers. They turn on and off quickly, but they don't let you finesse the water flow as a gate valve would. Gun nozzles let you squeeze or release a lever to control water flow. Look for one that is threaded at both ends, so you can put it in-line--that is, between the hose and the hose-end nozzle. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.