Magazine article Security Management

Risky Business

Magazine article Security Management

Risky Business

Article excerpt

Earlier this year, two traveling jewelry salesmen were shot at close range and robbed of hundreds of thousands of dollars worth of diamonds inside a Washington, D.C., restaurant. The men were having lunch after showing their merchandise to some local businesses. Robert Frank, vice president of the Jewelers' Security Alliance (JSA), calls the incident "not unusual." That begs the question: in the era of the Internet, why are traveling jewelry salesmen still hitting the road?

The answer, says Frank, is that buyers want to "feel and see jewels." Whereas high-end watches are now being sold through catalogs and CD-ROMs, jewelry is unique, requiring jewelry sales representatives to tote their high-value goods door to door or at exhibition events called trunk and remount shows.

Given that reality, the industry has looked for ways to protect its traveling agents. Some success has been achieved through group events. For example, one successful method of protecting shows has been to blanket the scene with uniformed police. "[Gang members] have not yet attacked uniformed sworn police officers," Frank says.

Yet police resources can only go so far. …

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