Magazine article American Libraries

This Month, 61 Years Ago

Magazine article American Libraries

This Month, 61 Years Ago

Article excerpt

... LIBRARIANS WERE CAREFULLY reading Clara Herbert's Personnel Administration in Public Libraries, a book ALA had just published. It synthesized the lessons that the federal government had learned in the previous decade about job analysis and classification, and applied them to the administration of public libraries.

Herbert's book was published over a quarter-century after the 1911 publication of Frederick Winslow Taylor's Principles of Scientific Management, which laid the 20th-century foundations for the emerging field of management science. But librarians didn't necessarily rush to embrace Taylor's ideas. Although an ALA Committee on Library Administration undertook a survey of library procedures shortly after Taylor published his book, C. C. Williamson of the Carnegie Corporation reported eight years later that, to his knowledge, no director had as yet specifically connected efficient library management to the prevailing philosophy of library service. Thirty-three years later Donald Coney of the University of California/Berkeley announced the results of a survey of library administrators he had conducted, which had led him to conclude that relatively few were acquainted with modern management principles.

Hooked on initialisms

In subsequent decades, however, librarians began reading management theorists like Peter Drucker, Chris Argyris, Rensis Likert, and Douglas McGregor, all of whom wrote much about new techniques for planning, governing, and analyzing organizations. Then in 1969 the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) established a Committee on University Library Management and, with the help of the Council on Library Resources (CLR) and the American Council on Education, sponsored a comprehensive study of university library management. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.