Magazine article American Forests

Ask the Tree Doctor

Magazine article American Forests

Ask the Tree Doctor

Article excerpt

Please welcome our new volunteer Tree Doctor, Howard Burnett. A 31-year veteran of the U.S. Forest Service, Burnett served in the National Forest System area and in State and Private Forestry. After retiring in 1986, he worked part-time for AMERICAN FORESTS, the National Association of State Foresters, and the Conservation Communications Association. Burnett joins our own crack Tree Doctor Cheryl Kollin, director of the Urban Forest Center, and other AMERICAN FORESTS staff.

Q: I have some seeds off a cedar tree cone. I'd like to turn them into seedlings and then plant them. How do I get the little seeds to start growing? Do they need to be cooked or frozen first? Does the brown part of the seed need to be peeled off or does a squirrel have to eat them?

Ben and Gail Carlson, via e-mail

A: You have seeds from a cedar (genus cedrus), which is not native to the United States but has been planted ornamentally. USDA Handbook No. 450, Seeds of Woody Plants in the United States, warns that cedrus seed has a fairly high percentage of non-viable seed, about half, so don't get too discouraged. Try drying the seeds, and de-wing them. Put them in a jar in your refrigerator for two weeks to hasten germination. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.