Magazine article Black Issues in Higher Education

Officials Look to Boost Minority Graduations at N.J. Colleges

Magazine article Black Issues in Higher Education

Officials Look to Boost Minority Graduations at N.J. Colleges

Article excerpt

HACKENSACK, N.J.

The number of minority students enrolled at New Jersey colleges is on the rise, but their graduation rates still lag behind those of White students.

While about 60 percent of White students in New Jersey graduate from college within six years after they enroll, only about 40 percent of Black and Hispanic students do.

"If the dynamics are left naturally on their own, the picture will get worse," James Sulton, executive director of the New Jersey Commission on Higher Education, told The Sunday Record of Hackensack.

College administrators point to financial troubles, social isolation and lack of resources in public schools that many of their students attended.

The commission says one way to narrow the graduation gap is to pump more money into the Educational Opportunity Fund, which helps pay for nontuition expenses of low-income students.

While students of all races are eligible, 75 percent of those in the program are minorities.

Several colleges have other tactics to try to increase minority retention. …

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