Magazine article Security Management

Is Spying a Job Fit for the Birds?

Magazine article Security Management

Is Spying a Job Fit for the Birds?

Article excerpt

What better way is there to perform natural surveillance than through nature? In other words, why riot outfit nature to aid in information collection? That sort of thinking has gotten researchers to explore the animal and insect worlds as means of espionage, such as the work being done to attach miniature cameras to cockroaches. Now comes word that birds might be getting into the act.

In November of last year, media outlets reported that Indian authorities had captured a highly trained falcon wearing a tiny antenna and high-frequency transmitter near the Pakistan-India border in the western India desert state of Rajasthan. Reuters quoted an Indian patrolman as having a "strong suspicion" that Pakistani officials had trained the bird to spy on Indian activities in border areas. Indiaabroad.com reported that the incident was the third in one year.

Pakistani officials in the United States told Security Management that the claims were "far-fetched." Asad Hayauddin, the press attache for the Pakistan embassy in Washington, D.C., speculated that the captured falcons were used for hunting by Arab dignitaries who favor that region of Pakistan for ducks and other quarry. …

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