Magazine article Marketing to Women: Addressing Women and Women's Sensibilities

Few Women Are Coaching Women's Sports

Magazine article Marketing to Women: Addressing Women and Women's Sensibilities

Few Women Are Coaching Women's Sports

Article excerpt

As women's participation in high school and college sports has risen to all-time highs, the proportion of women coaching women's teams has declined. In 1972, 90% of women's college teams had female coaches; in 2000 fewer than half (46%) had female head coaches, while 58% had female assistant coaches, according to Professors Emeritae Linda Jean Carpenter and R. Vivian Acosta of Brooklyn College. Male coaches were hired to fill 80% of new head coaching positions available in women's college sports in the past two seasons.

A separate study by doctoral students at Texas A&M and Ohio State Universities finds that female assistant coaches express less interest in becoming head coaches than their male peers do: 93% of male assistant coaches are interested in becoming head coaches, while 68% of female assistant coaches are interested in doing so.

An informal polling of female coaches by Sports Illustrated for Women finds that women coaches are more likely than men to be concerned with general comfort level in their coaching jobs; both male and female coaches believe women are more likely than men to stay on with a team they've grown comfortable with. Many women also describe head coaching positions as extremely high-pressure, increasingly results-oriented, and requiring travel and long hours that are not compatible with women's often extensive family responsibilities.

Some coaches say the increased prestige of women's sports is simply drawing more interest from male coaches. …

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