Magazine article Insight on the News

Old Age Ain't What It Used to Be

Magazine article Insight on the News

Old Age Ain't What It Used to Be

Article excerpt

The AARP, formerly known as the American Association for Retired Persons and now simply known by its acronym, is retooling itself to accommodate a flood of new 50-somethings who are redefining the terms "elderly" and "older." In October, the organization wrapped its Washington headquarters in 3,500 pounds of vinyl mesh fabric to call attention to its efforts to reinvent itself.

"We have this avalanche of boomers coming down the pike," says AARP Associate Executive Director Bill Novelli. "One of them turns 50 every seven seconds. The question was: How were we to be relevant to our new members and stay relevant to our old members?"

The AARP started asking these questions three years ago, shortly after the first members of the baby boom turned 50. One of its decisions was to retool Modern Maturity, AARP's signature magazine with 22 million subscribers, into two versions: one for the 56-65 age group and another for those older than 65.

"Retirement is being redefined in America," Novelli says. …

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