Magazine article Supervisory Management

The Principles of Retraining

Magazine article Supervisory Management

The Principles of Retraining

Article excerpt

The Principles of Retraining

Training isn't something you only do with brand new employees. Every time there's a change within your department, you need to consider its implications on the work done by those who report to you. Retraining may be necessary for a variety of reasons--from company growth, to turnover, to new technological developments or productivity requirements, to employee performance problems. You may even want to look ahead and identify those employees who may require new skills in the future and begin their retraining now to fill anticipated future positions.

To be successful at retraining, you may want to follow these ten steps:

1. Evaluate the educational, experiential, and personal skills of employees in key jobs or jobs experiencing technological or procedural changes. Then consider the skill levels needed to do the jobs in the future. The difference between the two levels will be the retraining starting point.

2. Decide upon either an "in-house" or a "canned" (consultant-based) training program. Obviously, "in-house" programs require more time and preparation but they can be company-oriented. "Canned" programs are quicker getting off the ground but may not fully reflect a company's needs. The company's goals, objectives, trainee population, and time frames, as well as the skill levels of trainees, will help to determine the type of program to be used.

3. Explain the purpose of retraining to those selected. …

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