Magazine article Folio: the Magazine for Magazine Management

More Printers Add Selective Binding-Ink-Jet

Magazine article Folio: the Magazine for Magazine Management

More Printers Add Selective Binding-Ink-Jet

Article excerpt

More printers add selective binding/ink-job

Charlotte, N.C.--Publishers can expect to hear a lot more pitches for selective binding and ink-jet capabilities from their printers, according to William Lamparter, president of PrintCom Consultants.

In a recent Graphic Arts Industry survey of printers and their bindery capabilities, Lamparter found about 22 percent of the responding larger publication printers (billing over $10 million) plan to add selective/ink-jet capability between 1989 and 1990.

One hundred of the publication printers in the United States, he adds, handle 80 percent of catalog and magazine printing. The figure indicates that publishers and printers are becoming less hesitant to utilize the technology, developed by R.R. Donnelley & Sons Company more than a decade ago.

"Most publication web printers are in, or will soon be in," says Fred Rogers, managing director of the Research and Engineering Council of the Graphic Arts Industry. The growing interest focuses on the ability to target specific readers with tailored magazines and catalogs. Selective binding also allows for a finer postal sortation.

Nearly all agree that Time Inc. was the ice breaker, having recently announced plans to use ink-jet and selective binding on Time, People, Sports Illustrated and other titles.

A case in point is Brown Printing, which had one selective binding line in its Waseca, Minnesota, plant before adding another this year. The printer will next be adding selective binding in its Kentucky location, says Monica Lundquist, mailing list/ink-jet coordinator. …

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