Magazine article Nation's Cities Weekly

NLC First Vice President Leads Delegation at PTI Conference

Magazine article Nation's Cities Weekly

NLC First Vice President Leads Delegation at PTI Conference

Article excerpt

NLC First Vice President and Minnetonka, Minn., Mayor Karen Anderson and Mayor Bill Campbell of host city Atlanta led a strong NLC delegation of people responsible for transforming government through technology at the Public Technology, Inc. (PTI) Annual Member Conference held April 18-21.

PTI is the non-profit technology research, development and commercialization arm of NLC, the National Association of Counties (NACo) and the International City/County Management Association (ICMA). More than 350 people attended the conference.

Among the attendees was Anderson, who represented cities and NLC during the opening general session along with leaders of NACo and ICMA. She spoke on topics including electronic government and the Web for Cities project taking place in Minnesota while she also served as a spokesperson for smaller jurisdictions nationwide. Anderson and former NLC executive director Alan Beals then participated in an invitation-only roundtable discussion sponsored by Government Technology magazine. Beals made the short trip from Savannah to participate in the session as well as serve as a morning keynote speaker April 20 on the topic of transformation, keeping in line with the conference theme of Transforming Government Through Technology.

Campbell stayed on theme while speaking to Web Forum 2001 attendees at the conference. The mayor said that his city--the birthplace of the civil rights movement and its leader, the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.--is now focusing on cyber rights and attempts to bridge the digital divide.

"It would not be fair if those who have access to technology can sit at home and pay bills online while those who do not must pay to go to City Hall, often through mass transit, and stand in long lines," he said.

The mayor said that in Atlanta only 17 percent of families with annual incomes of $20,000 per year or less have personal computers while 87 percent of families with annual incomes of $75,000 per year or more have personal computers. …

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