Magazine article The Nation

Cantorial

Magazine article The Nation

Cantorial

Article excerpt

The transfer of Cafe Crown is scarcely surprising. With a large star-studded cast, a set that gets its own round of applause and an established record as a crowd-pleaser (it dates from 1942), the only wonder is that it required such a nest as the Public Theater to hatch in. I'd have thought Cantorial would command a similar demographic appeal, and I can't imagine why it wound up at the tiny Lamb's Theatre, unless it was thought that Ira Levin, whose previous hits for film and stage include Rosemary's Baby and Deathtrap, has mellowed into a kinder, gentler, but (alas) less marketable commodity. He's undoubtedly still a pro, with a pro's knowledge of all our buttons and how to push them, but though Cantorial is a ghost story, it is as wholesome - and unscary - as broccoli.

The plot is simple. Yuppie lovers (played by Anthony Fusco and Lesly Kahn) are cohabiting in a renovated synagogue on the Lower East Side. …

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