Magazine article Newsweek

Briefcase

Magazine article Newsweek

Briefcase

Article excerpt

NUTRITION Green But Sweet

Promising kids a cupcake if they'll eat their brussels sprouts tells them that vegetables are work and sugar is fun. Why not mix the two? "Except for the desire for sweets... food preferences are learned," says Elizabeth D. Capaldi, a University of Buffalo psychologist who studies taste preferences. "If a person eats a repellent food 10 times, the taste receptors in their brains will actually change, and they will learn to like the food." She recommends mixing a tablespoon or so of sugar in half a cup of water and pouring it over broccoli or another vegetable to sweeten it slightly while retaining its taste. Hey, it works in the lab. SMOKING Two New Ways to Kick That Killer Habit Would more people quit smoking if it weren't habit-forming? A Florida drug company called Nabi says animal studies show its newly patented "nicotine vaccine," NicVAX, generates antibodies that keep nicotine from sparking an addictive response in the brain. Nabi is now seeking FDA approval to begin human trials. Meanwhile, Duke University researchers have developed a liquid replacement for nicotine gum and the patch. The liquid smoke tastes like a dirty ashtray, say the scientists, but mixing it with a little juice or coffee makes it palatable. A preliminary study found that after six months the liquid successfully kept 20 percent of people cigarette-free. This is no better than the patch, but according to the Centers for Disease Control, each new anti-smoking technique leads more people to try to quit. …

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