Magazine article Nutrition Health Review

Nutrition Facts Labels Should Also Include Energy Density

Magazine article Nutrition Health Review

Nutrition Facts Labels Should Also Include Energy Density

Article excerpt

Energy density--the number of calories per ounce--should also be listed on packaged food Nutrition Facts labels, suggests a Penn State researcher.

"When you make even small changes in the energy density of a food, by adding vegetables or fruit or by reducing fat content, it can have a big effect on intake," says Dr. Barbara Rolls, Penn State University's Guthrie Chair of Nutrition, College of Health and Human Development.

Dr. Rolls spoke at the Experimental Biology Conference, San Diego, in April 2000.

She is co-author of the weight management book, Volumetrics: Feel Full on Fewer Calories, which suggests that people can enjoy their favorite foods, feel full after meals, and still lose weight.

The basic strategy of Volumetrics--eating a satisfying volume of food while controlling calories and meeting nutrient requirements--is based on a series of studies conducted in Penn State's Laboratory for the Study of Human Ingestive Behavior over the last seven years.

Eating one's usual amount but selecting low-energy-density foods, which have fewer calories per ounce, offers a way to cut back on calories and still leave the table feeling full and satisfied.

In an interview with Penn State's Department of Public Information, Dr. …

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