Magazine article International Wildlife

Grass-Roots Activists 'Keep the Wild Alive' through NWF Grant Program

Magazine article International Wildlife

Grass-Roots Activists 'Keep the Wild Alive' through NWF Grant Program

Article excerpt

From volunteer turtle watchers in the Florida Panhandle to teenagers creating new habitat for endangered bats in Kentucky, ordinary citizens are using the National Wildlife Federation's Species Recovery Fund grants to help save imperiled species nationwide.

Last year, NWF's Keep the Wild Alive program awarded the first ten grants of between $4,000 and $7,000 to local organizations and individuals working to improve on-the-ground conditions for endangered species featured in its Keep the Wild Alive campaign. Among the projects just concluded:

* The Rowan County Wildlife Club of Morehead, Kentucky, worked with the U.S. Forest Service to create 65 small wetlands on dry mountain ridges in the Daniel Boone National Forest to provide drinking water and insects as food for Indiana bats. Local students, including some from a group home for troubled teenagers, helped erect roosting boxes to improve summer habitat for some 15,000 bats that hibernate in nearby caves.

Workshops and tours of the new wetlands introduced 40 teachers from across the state to the importance of wetlands and the plight of endangered species.

* Scientists and students affiliated with the Tall Timbers Research Station in Tallahassee, Florida, have created six clusters of man-made nest cavities for red-cockaded woodpeckers on private lands in the Red Hills of northern Florida and southern Georgia, where development and forest fragmentation are threatening one of the largest remaining populations. Woodpeckers already have moved into one of the clusters. …

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