Magazine article Nutrition Health Review

Memory: Dominant Tenant in the Brain

Magazine article Nutrition Health Review

Memory: Dominant Tenant in the Brain

Article excerpt

Memory: Dominant Tenant in the Brain

If memory is an illusive entity, evidence does exist that it uses many parts of the brain for its purposes.

Remember, without memory we could not learn from experience, there would be no intellectual functioning, no development of language, no memory for meaning, no recognition of our environment. The newborn baby could not remember to nurse, nor could the adult brain remember how to breathe, sleep, digest and eliminate food.

Memory also inhabits the genes -- which makes some of the aforementioned functions possible. Genetic memory also is responsible for individual characteristics both physical and mental.

Psychologists, notably Carl Jung, have theorized that we are also influenced by collective memories inherited from our long line of ancestors. Some people insist that they are able to "remember" events from before their birth.

Principal regions of the brain that appear to be important in learning and memory are the cerebellum and the hippocampus. The former has been identified as a storehouse of conditioned responses. Brain-injured people who are identified as retarded usually suffer from cerebellar damage. Their inability to coordinate movement, thought processes and integrate learning is attributed to such trauma. …

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