Magazine article Security Management

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Magazine article Security Management

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www.securitymanagement.com

During the past five-plus years, Security Management Online has brought its readers hundreds of security reports, surveys, studies, bills, Web sites, policies, forms, checklists, and other information to help security professionals do their jobs better. If you haven't taken advantage of this free resource, it's not too late--older items remain in the archives--with new information added as news breaks. Come see what you're missing. Below are some of the newest additions. (Also look for the symbol throughout the magazine to see what other resources are being added this month to SM Online).

Weapons detection. X-ray imaging, microwave holography, and acoustic detection are a few of the many technologies put into service for detecting weapons and contraband hidden on the human body. These systems can be used in various ways, such as via wand-type metal detectors, x-ray imagers, or microwave radar imagers.

A new guide developed by the National Institute of Standards and Technology for the National Institute of Justice helps users of these systems "better understand the operation, limitations, and applicability of [the various technologies] to their specific application and to provide an overview of the state of development in the [technologies]..." For example, microwave holographic imaging is described as a portal-type device that scans people using microwave energy, hut limitations include inability to detect items in body cavities, the requirement that the subject stand still for a few seconds, and the possibility that the system will make people feel claustrophobic. Besides examining the pros and cons of the approaches, the guide explores such topics as possible applications, parameters affecting detection, and recommended performance standards. SM Online has it.

Gangs. Murder, drug peddling, car theft, and cell-phone cloning were the preferred crimes of a street gang called New Breed, which metastasized from Chicago into such cities as Indianapolis, Atlanta, Louisville, and Cincinnati in the mid-1990s. But as recounted in an article in a recent FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin, a partnership between state and local police and FBI units, which commenced in mid-1997, annihilated the gang's ranks in Indianapolis. The key tool used by the partnership was a massive wiretapping effort--3,6oo hours' worth-on the main cell phone used by the gang, which had an identifiable account holder. …

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