Magazine article U.S. Catholic

Mccormick's Quick Takes: Human Truths Stranger Than Fiction

Magazine article U.S. Catholic

Mccormick's Quick Takes: Human Truths Stranger Than Fiction

Article excerpt

Blade Runner (Columbia, 1982). In Ridley Scott's violent and smoky blend of post-apocalyptic sci-fi and hard-boiled film noir, Rick Deckard (Harrison Ford) is an ex-cop conscripted to hunt down and destroy Roy Batty (Rutger Hauer) and four other runaway cyborgs that have come back to Earth in search of their maker and a little revenge. Along the way, Deckard--a Philip Marlowe clone complete with trench coat, gravelly voice-over, and a taste for single malt scotch--falls for an angelic looking android (Sean Young) who thinks she's a real live girl and is forced to recognize both the all-too-human passions of his robotic prey and the less-than-humane sympathies of their Homo sapien creators.

In the end, humanity seems to be less a question of wiring or DNA and more a matter of the heart. * * *

The Stepford Wives (Columbia, 1975). Imagine a cross between Invasion of the Body Snatchers and Valley of the Dolls, and you've got a general sense of Ira Levin and William Goldman's chilling sci-fi thriller about two suburban wives trapped in a Connecticut village where all the other women suffer from a chronic case of mindless marital bliss.

Katharine Ross and Paula Prentiss can't figure why they're the only wives in Stepford who aren't reading articles on 1,000 ways to please their hubbies or don't act like someone put Valium in the water supply.

Levin, who terrified us with Rosemary's Baby and/he Boys From Brazil, spins a monstrous fable about a men's club that turns women into sex objects in ways not even Hugh Hefner ever imagined. …

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