Magazine article Clinical Psychiatry News

Comorbidity Raises OCD Relapse Risk in Children

Magazine article Clinical Psychiatry News

Comorbidity Raises OCD Relapse Risk in Children

Article excerpt

PHOENIX, ARIZ. -- Although comorbidity does not generally impair the therapeutic response to a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor in children and adolescents with obsessive-compulsive disorder, it does make relapse more likely after treatment is discontinued, Dr. Daniel A. Geller reported in a poster presentation at the annual meeting of the New Clinical Drug Evaluation Unit sponsored by the National Institute of Mental Health.

These findings suggest that comorbidity is a predictive factor that should be taken into account when designing treatments for this population, said Dr. Geller of Harvard Medical School, Boston.

He reported results of a two-phase trial involving 335 pediatric patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder who were treated with paroxetine. More than half (58%) of the group had at least one comorbid psychiatric disorder, nearly onethird (30%) had two or more disorders, and 15% had three or more comorbid disorders.

Overall, the presence of comorbidity did not have a significant impact on response to treatment: 68% of patients with at least one other disorder had substantial improvement in symptoms and clinician global rating during a 16week trial, compared with 75% of those without comorbidity.

Although the response rate dropped as the number of concurrent disorders increased, the difference was not significant. Certain specific disorders, however, were associated with significantly poorer response rates: attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, tic disorder, and oppositional defiant disorder, Dr. …

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