Magazine article Landscape & Irrigation

Match Your SNOW Plows to the Jobs, Trucks at Hand. (Power Equipment)

Magazine article Landscape & Irrigation

Match Your SNOW Plows to the Jobs, Trucks at Hand. (Power Equipment)

Article excerpt

What came first, the chicken or the egg? Do you buy a snow plow and truck based on the work that you will have, or do you find work based on the truck and plow that you have? The size truck you have will dictate what model of plow you can have and in turn decide what type of accounts you will have.

Look for plows that are designed to exact vehicle specifications, that are also intended for a specific application based on the GVWR of the truck and the manufacturer's recommendations.

Meyer Products, for instance, classifies its plows into five main series, the TM (Trimline), ST (Standard), C (Commercial), the HM (Highway Municipality) and the E-2 Vector (V-plow).

Plows are available in both steel and polyethylene. Poly is better for contractors because it's stronger, it doesn't rust, and you don't have to paint it. It also "rolls" the snow because there's less friction on the plow's surface. Poly plows, however, are heavier, because they have more support ribs than steel. Steel blades are considered when price is a factor, but anyone who's real serious about plowing should get a poly.

Smaller sizes are best used for tight areas like driveways and walkways. Designed for down-sized pick-ups, jeeps, and select SUVs, their plowing swath is generally around 6 or 7 feet.

Actually, standard-sized plows are the most popular because of their versatility. Generally speaking, they are rugged enough to handle small-business parking lots, but still agile enough to plow any driveway. …

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