Magazine article Insight on the News

College Set for Students Who Studied at Home: Home-Schooled Students Now Have a College That Caters to Their Needs. in the Year 2000, Patrick Henry College in Virginia Will Admit Students Who Plan to Major in Government Studies. (Education)

Magazine article Insight on the News

College Set for Students Who Studied at Home: Home-Schooled Students Now Have a College That Caters to Their Needs. in the Year 2000, Patrick Henry College in Virginia Will Admit Students Who Plan to Major in Government Studies. (Education)

Article excerpt

When the first ground is broken for Patrick Henry College on June 25, Mike Farris will be one step closer to his dream. The school, to be built on 44 acres in Virginia, will be the first college in the country geared for students who have been home schooled.

"I wanted to help our country, and I wanted to help our young people," says Farris, founder of the Home School Legal Defense Association and father of 10 children. "I wanted to break out of the educational box like I've helped to do with K-through-12 education."

The nondenominational Christian college, located within commuting distance of Washington, will open in fall 2000. Initially, the school will offer a lone undergraduate major in government, featuring an apprenticeship program designed to give students practical experience in public policy and service. Students will work on faculty-supervised research and writing projects for members of Congress, state legislators, federal agencies, think tanks and advocacy groups. Tuition should range from $12,000 to $14,000 per year, a fee which includes room and board.

"We are combining a traditional liberal-arts model with a white-collar version of vocational training," says the school's provost and academic dean, Brad Jacob, former chief executive officer of the Christian Legal Society. "It all comes from the ivory tower concerns, where students learn theory but don't know beans about how to work in the workplace."

Fifty students will be admitted to the first freshman class, along with 50 junior-level transfer students who may enroll after finishing 40 hours of general-education courses elsewhere (students don't have to be home schooled). …

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