Magazine article Science News

Cloning's Ups and Downs. (Biomedicine)

Magazine article Science News

Cloning's Ups and Downs. (Biomedicine)

Article excerpt

There's been good news and bad news about cloning of late. On the worrisome side, one of the creators of Dolly, the world's first cloned mammal, report that the nearly 6-year-old sheep has developed arthritis in her left hip and knees. That's early for a sheep to show such a malady, and the report renews concern that cloning may accelerate aging (SN: 4/29/00, p. 279).

There's no way to confirm that the arthritis is attributable to cloning, cautions Ian Wilmut, one of Dolly's cloners at the Roslin Institute in Edinburgh. Still, he calls upon other cloners to monitor the long-term health of their animals.

Now the good news: In an advance that one day may help people needing transplants, two biotech firms have turned to cloning in their attempt to create pigs with organs that human bodies won't reject. Using nonhuman organs such as pig hearts and kidneys in people is the basis of a controversial strategy known as xenotransplantation. …

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