Magazine article History Today

Birth of Charles Lindbergh February 4th, 1902. (Months Past)

Magazine article History Today

Birth of Charles Lindbergh February 4th, 1902. (Months Past)

Article excerpt

THE AMERICAN PILOT who soared to worldwide fame when he made the first non-stop flight across the Atlantic in 1927 was born Charles Augustus Lindbergh in Detroit. The Lindbergh family, originally Swedish, produced a succession of rugged individualists. The baby's grandfather had emigrated to the United States in 1859 with his `wife' and baby son, Charles August, leaving his legal wife and their children behind. Changing his name from Ola Mansson to August Lindbergh, he settled in Minnesota near a place called Melrose. There were only two other families there. The Lindberghs built themselves a log cabin, which grew bigger as their farm prospered and more babies arrived.

The eldest son, Charles August, a shrewd character, known laconically as C.A., was a crack shot whose boyhood task was shooting the family's meat supply with a muzzle-loading shotgun and homemade bullets. After minimal schooling, he spent a year studying law at the University of Michigan, graduated in 1883 and set up in practice in the Minnesota town of Little Falls on the Mississippi. The area was developing fast and C.A. developed with it, becoming the town's leading lawyer, representing major business companies and investing profitably in the local real estate. His first wife bore him two daughters and died young. In 1901 he married a second time, a science teacher called Evangeline Land, seventeen years his junior and the daughter of a prominent Detroit dentist. She went back to her parents' home in Detroit for the arrival of their son, who was delivered by her doctor uncle at 1.30 in the morning and weighed nine-and-a-half pounds.

The future aviator was his doting mother's only child. He grew up in Little Falls and in Washington DC after his father had become a Minnesota congressman in 1906. His parents separated when he was five, but did not divorce, which would have destroyed C. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.