Magazine article School Arts

Kitchen Utensil Design: Students Will Understand How a Simple Kitchen Utensil or Object Can Be Used to Create a Repetitive Visual Pattern

Magazine article School Arts

Kitchen Utensil Design: Students Will Understand How a Simple Kitchen Utensil or Object Can Be Used to Create a Repetitive Visual Pattern

Article excerpt

Materials

* Sketchbook, 11 x 14" (28 x 36 cm) minimum

* Pencil, felt-tip markers

* 4 x 6" (10 x 15 cm) oak tag for stencil

* X-acto knives/scissors

* 18 x 24" (46 x 61 cm) newsprint and white vellum

Pre-Activity

Students are to select a single object found in their kitchen, such as an electric mixer, a teapot, an ice cream scoop, a wire whisk, a can opener, or a potato peeler. After picking one utensil, they draw it in five varied ways in their sketchbook:

1. Contour line or weighted line.

2. Value study (rich blacks through shades of gray).

3. In color--student choice of media (this does not have to be realistic color).

4. Focusing on the texture of the object (smooth, rough, reflective, etc.).

5. Using the shape of the object to create a design, repeat the subject to fill the paper creating a pattern--develop this image only using pencil in a line drawing. This is intended to be a rough draft.

As an art history reference, share the work of M. C. Escher (Dutch graphic artist, 1898-1972). His work offers examples of rhythmic repetition of like shapes found in nature or in art.

This pre-activity can be done as homework over consecutive days or weeks if desired. Group critiquing happens after each individual drawing is done.

Process

As students bring in their sketchbooks and share their last image in a group critique, point out which designs maintain interest and which ones create pattern. This is intended to have students see how they have done collectively and make decisions as to how they will individually progress. The discussion shares how the object can be used right-side up or upside down, straight across the page or at a diagonal to create a pattern.

The class work begins as the students trace or redraw their chosen subject onto the sheet of oak tag paper. …

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