Magazine article The FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin

National Crime Victimization Survey. (Crime Data)

Magazine article The FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin

National Crime Victimization Survey. (Crime Data)

Article excerpt

According to the U.S. Department of Justice's National Crime Victimization Survey, Americans experienced about 1 million fewer violent crimes in 2000 than they did in 1999. The Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS), which conducts the survey, noted that the violent and property crime victimization rates were at their lowest since the survey began in 1973. The 2000 victimization level continues a downward trend in the number of violent victimizations that began in 1994.

Almost every demographic group identified in the survey--including males, females, whites, blacks, Hispanics, non-Hispanics, and 12-to 14-year-olds-experienced less violent crime in 2000 than they did during 1999. The largest rate decreases between 1993 and 2000 were for Hispanics (down an average 5.7 percent per year) and males (down an average annual 4.6 percent). Western and Midwestern residents were violence victims at rates that were higher than for Northeastern and Southern residents.

Most violent crime victims (67 percent) did not face an armed offender during 2000. …

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