Magazine article Marketing

DIRECT MAIL SHOWCASE: Direct Mailings Must Make an Impact the Minute They Land on the Recipient's Door Mat. Ken Gofton Weighs Up Four Mailouts That Stand out from the Crowd in Getting Their Message Across

Magazine article Marketing

DIRECT MAIL SHOWCASE: Direct Mailings Must Make an Impact the Minute They Land on the Recipient's Door Mat. Ken Gofton Weighs Up Four Mailouts That Stand out from the Crowd in Getting Their Message Across

Article excerpt

MARBLES SEEKS CUT-THROUGH WITH ENVELOPE LINE

Client: HFC Bank
Agency: Clark McKay & Walpole
Distribution: July
Size of mailing: 410,000

The same thought crops up again this month, in spectacular fashion. A new customer recruitment mailing devised by Clark McKay & Walpole for HFC Bank's marbles credit card has everything you would expect to find in the envelope on the outside, except the application form.

And the body copy is a delight. 'Uh oh', it begins, 'another credit card envelope lands on your doormat. Except this is marbles. And this time, everything you might want to know is right here on the envelope. Which is handy if you're trying to butter your toast and find your shoes, and the cat's getting under your feet'.

'The message is simple - you don't even have to open the envelope, because you can apply for a card online,' says Steve Walpole, the agency's executive creative director. 'You couldn't do this with a lot of brands, but marbles has that quirkiness, and can get away with it.'

The mailshot was devised as a possible successor to marbles' existing and customer recruitment pack. It's being tested against the old one in two versions - one with a full application form, one with a shorter form that is easier to complete, but yields less data.

'We have always tried to make marbles a bit more fun and irreverent than the rest,' says Jane Perrins, HFC's marketing communications director.

'To be honest, we were surprised when we saw the concept for this pack.

But there are so many credit card mailings out there, we were looking for something that would cut through.'

BROADVISION PROMOTES PERSONALISATION

Client: BroadVision
Agency: Mason Zimbler
Distribution: July

'We are seeing an increasing concern to make savings, and handle customers at lower cost,' says Alan Ranger, BroadVision's marketing director for Northern Europe. BroadVision client BT, for example, calculates that a transaction costing pounds 3.30 via a call centre, is only 2.6p via the net.

But the key to progress, Ranger adds, is ensuring that the web site is easy for visitors to use. BroadVision, whose other clients include Lloyds TSB and Opodo, has its roots in one-to-one marketing. It believes the answer is personalisation, which means at the very least tailoring the internet experience to the type of visitor and ideally modifying it to the individual customer.

This theme is at the core of a mailing devised by high-tech marketing agency Mason Zimbler, targeting board-level prospects.

The plain but unusually long envelope contains a pack featuring an aerial view of a company's visitor car park, with the slogan 'The most powerful portals are personalised'. Inside this is a full-size replica number plate, with the recipient's initials.

This is the deluxe version developed for 100 key targets. There's also a generic mailer for the wider audience of 4900 recipients, and special variants for the travel, telecoms and finance sectors.

'The proposition is key - personalisation increases profits,' says the agency's joint managing director, Mark Mason. 'The number plate idea is an example of personalisation that people can relate to. It is also a status item that people pay extra for, and this hammers home how people value personalisation.'

The mailing is followed up with an e-mail, linked directly to a micro site, with case studies and detailed product information. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.