Magazine article Black Issues in Higher Education

More Seek Graduate School to Wait out Job Market. (Noteworthy News)

Magazine article Black Issues in Higher Education

More Seek Graduate School to Wait out Job Market. (Noteworthy News)

Article excerpt

PHILADELPHIA

Brett Tishler still has his senior year at Temple University ahead of him, but he's fairly sure what his future holds--more school. "With the way the economy is ... there's really nothing I can do right now except go to graduate school and hope that in another three or four years, something will change," says Tishler, 21, who is applying to law school.

He has plenty of company.

Law school applications are up 17.9 percent for 2002-2003, the biggest spike in a generation, according to the Law School Admission Council in Newtown. And business, education and other graduate programs are also experiencing a swell as graduates decide to stay in school rather than test an uncertain job market.

It's a big difference from the late 1990s when graduating students eschewed graduate schools for high-paying jobs and big signing bonuses at dot-com companies.

The law school council's preliminary count, taken July 5, tallied 88,418 applications nationwide, compared to 74,994 at the same time last year.

Business, education and other graduate programs are also seeing more applicants, although interest in medicine remains low.

Columbia University's business school, for example, received 7,400 applications this year, up about 26 percent. The University of Pennsylvania had 1,700 applications to its graduate school of education, a 38 percent hike.

"There might be a little bit of a dot-com backlash," says Tom Kecskemethy, associate dean of the education school at Penn. …

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