Magazine article Nutrition Health Review

False Despair

Magazine article Nutrition Health Review

False Despair

Article excerpt

False Despair

A man called me the other day, a professor at a local college. His friend, a 47-year-old woman he wanted to marry, had been diagnosed with pancreatic cancer, and he desperately wanted my advice on alternatives. When he told me her name, tears welled up in my eyes. By coincidence she turned out to be my daughter's favorite teacher at college.

I explained my agreement with People Against Cancer, of Otho, Iowa, by which I consult on the telephone with sustaining members of their non-profit organization. Such members also receive a copy of my book The Cancer Industry and The Cancer Chronicles newsletter, and are therefore up to speed by the time I talk to them. This man joined, and we had a long talk.

Orthodox medicine, we both agreed, had little to offer his loved one. Five-year survival is a few percentage points for all stages of adenocarcinoma of the exocrine pancreas. For her stage IV cancer, it is close to zero, and such patients go quickly. Her doctors at Memorial Sloan-Kettering were offering her a 5-FU-like drug, but with little enthusiasm.

I then told him about three alternative therapies: (1) antineoplastons, peptides found in blood and urine that Stanislaw Burzynski, M.D., Ph.D., discovered and has used for over a decade as a cancer treatment. These are now being investigated in Japan, China, Italy, Poland, and the United States, including a group at the U.S. Defense Department. But Burzynski has been dogged by opposition all along the way; (2) IAT of Dr. Lawrence Burton. When he was a researcher at St. Vincent's Hospital (N.Y.), Burton came up with a novel way of destroying tumors in mice with blood serum fractions. Opposition by the Food and Drug Administration forced him to move to the Bahamas.

What evidence is there that these treatments really work, the man asked. I pointed to Burton and Burzynski's many published papers. I also gave him names and phone numbers of pancreatic cancer patients who had been treated with these therapies and survived. Some were free of their disease for more than five years.

The man called some of these people and was impressed. I cautioned that such cases were rare, but some "miracles" did exist. He excitedly said he would talk to his friend and get back to me. The next day he phoned. I could hear defeat in his voice. His friend had decided not to try any of these treatments. Instead, she would "follow her orthodox doctors. She wants to finish some school work," he added, sheepishly. …

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