Magazine article Sunset

In Many Parts of the World, the Peanut Is Serious Food

Magazine article Sunset

In Many Parts of the World, the Peanut Is Serious Food

Article excerpt

In many parts of the world, the peanut is serious food The poor peanut has some awfully undignified connotations--ball games, elephants, insubstantial emoluments. But this humble legume is serious food, with high protein and fat contents (30 and 47 percent, respectively). In Earle Presten's Satay Sauce, it is taken as seriously as it deserves to be--and its flavor triumphs, despite a host of additional ingredients including such heavy hitters as garlic, ginger, jalapeno chilies, oyster sauce, soy sauce, and taco sauce.

Mr. Presten concocted his sauce for satay (or sate), a dish Indonesian in origin but sometimes found on Chinese and Indian menus, too. Simply put, satay consists of bite-size morsels of meat soaked in a spicy sauce, then grilled (or broiled) on a skewer and served with more sauce. Or you can grill the meat by itself, then add the sauce. A similar sauce also dresses cooked vegetables in an Indonesian dish known as gado gdo--and you can certainly use Mr. Presten's that way, too.

Satay Sauce

1 tablespoon salad oil 1/2 cup raw peanuts 1 small onion, chopped 2 small fresh jalapeno chilies, stemmed and seeded 1 piece fresh ginger (about a 1-in. …

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