Magazine article National Catholic Reporter

Reaction Mixed to Cardinal's Internet Posting of Names of Abusers. (Church in Crisis)

Magazine article National Catholic Reporter

Reaction Mixed to Cardinal's Internet Posting of Names of Abusers. (Church in Crisis)

Article excerpt

Baltimore Cardinal William Keeler's decision to release the names of more than 50 priests and religious brothers accused of child abuse in the archdiocese, and to post those names on the archdiocese's Web site, was, according to some observers, a welcome display of openness after years of hierarchical silence. Others called it a gross violation of due process.

The Sept. 25 release included summaries of accusations against the clergy, including some who are now deceased and others who deny the accusations.

"After much reflection and prayer--and following a thorough review of our records, going back decades--I have decided that we must be more open and transparent in our efforts to eradicate this evil within our Church," Keeler said in a letter to 180,000 archdiocesan households. The release is in keeping with the "transparency and openness" called for in the "Charter for the Protection of Children and Young People," approved by the U.S. bishops in June, said Keeler.

The release of information received mixed reactions.

Sorrow is widespread. "I think there is a great sense of sadness among the lay folks when they actually see the name of the priest and the parishes they were associated with," said Fr. Richard Bozzelli, pastor of Corpus Christi Parish, Baltimore. "Once you start putting names and places together, the immediacy and the palpability of the issue come forward."

Anger is apparent. "This left a lot of negative feelings among the priests and laypeople," said Fr. …

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