Magazine article American Libraries

The Top 10 Reasons to Be a Librarian: (With Apologies to David Letterman)

Magazine article American Libraries

The Top 10 Reasons to Be a Librarian: (With Apologies to David Letterman)

Article excerpt

As a high school library media specialist, I have the good fortune to work with, and sometimes mold, young people. If I'm lucky, I discover what they do after graduation. Recently, one of my favorite students informed me that after earning her humanities degree at a tiny private college, she was pursuing a master's degree in museum studies. Congratulating her, I jokingly said, "Watch it. That's awfully close to a master's in library science." She laughed and said: "Oh, I'd never do that." Somewhat defensively, I replied, "You could do worse."

Long after this brief conversation, I wondered, where did We, as librarians, go wrong? Why is there such an onus on this profession that a bright, young person would choose, well, any career but that of librarianship? I think it's sad. Librarianship has much to offer, and I think we can do better in promoting our profession. Toward that end, I present my top 10 reasons for being a librarian.

10 Ever-changing and renewing. The single thing I like most about being a librarian is that it is, to paraphrase Ernest Hemingway, a moveable feast. I've been employed in academic, public, and school libraries in three different states working in technical services, public services, and classrooms, and with street people, teachers, and young adults. I've booked psychics, mountain climbers, rock musicians, and landlords for programs. I teach, catalog, book talk, advise, troubleshoot, demonstrate, connect s-video cables, and shelve...in a single day. What I learned in my master's program bears little resemblance to what I actually do in my library today. Yet the principles remain; and, through conferences, professional literature, and networking, I hold my own. If the new books don't excite me, the new technologies do. Most importantly, I learn something new every day. Can you say that about working at McDonald's?

9 Romance. Okay, so I may be stretching things a bit here. I married a librarian. (For the record, we met in a singles group; but our paths would have crossed in local library circles eventually, I'm sure.) My case may be extreme, but there is help for the lovelorn in libraries--either in the wonderfully interesting colleagues we meet (see reasons #2 and #7) or in the books and resources libraries offer.

8 Useful skills. I did not enter library school with a soaring heart. I viewed the degree less as graduate school and more as a kind of trade school. Truthfully, my library education was both. I learned the value of organization (I finally put my massive LP collection in alpha order by artist). I discovered the importance of collection development, equal access to resources, and intellectual freedom. I learned valuable skills in locating and using information that serve me to this day, whether I'm helping a patron write a paper on the Manhattan Project or figuring out the best place to buy a teakettle online.

7 Great conferences. Librarians host good conferences. I love the hustle and bustle of ALA Annual Conference. I consider my state conference to be so necessary to my mental well-being that I often pay my own way. My husband's ties to the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions have taken us to Nairobi, Tokyo, Havana, and elsewhere. What better way to see the world and recharge the professional batteries? Conferences are blessed events, and you don't have them when you work at Wal-Mart. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.