Magazine article Marketing

High Noon at the ITC Corral

Magazine article Marketing

High Noon at the ITC Corral

Article excerpt

High noon at the ITC corral

There seems to be a widely held belief that the quality provisions in the Broadcasting Act will satisfactorily exclude the sort of cowboys who took over, and subsequently bankrupted, Australian television. This view seems to me to be based on a misunderstanding of what cowboy means in this context. Of course, the quality provisions would exclude a bidder who blithely announced that he had no interest in the region he was bidding for or the sort of programmes he intended to produce, but was merely in it for the money. However, such a bidder would be less a cowboy than a pantomime horse.

Any serious bidder for a Channel 3 franchise would ensure that his board was staffed with the requisite number of regional worthies and itinerant programme makers, all waving their awards. If any bidder does not know such people already, there are a number of highly adequate highly adequate consultants who could organise the introductions for the appropriate fee.

What constitutes a cowboy is not the inability to string together a plausible proposal, but rather the willingness to offer so much for a franchise that unless economic circumstances are quite unexpectedly favourable, there will not be enough money around to keep even the letter, let alone the spirit of the promises made. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.