Magazine article Book

Don't Fear the Ripper. (Crimetime)

Magazine article Book

Don't Fear the Ripper. (Crimetime)

Article excerpt

PATRICIA CORNWELL began investigating the Jack the Ripper case as a story for her fictional sleuth, Kay Scarpetta, but soon became consumed by the murders that paralyzed the Whitechapel neighborhood of London in 1888. Cornwell has flown teams of American investigators to and from London, torn apart a painting by one of England's most respected impressionists, and disregarded criticism from both historians and forensic experts. But with the release of Portrait of a Killer: Jack the Ripper--Case Closed, she believes the Ripper case is finally "too percent solved."

CORNWELL'S SUSPECT

Walter Sickert, a British impressionist painter (once an apprentice of James McNeill Whistler's) who lived in Whitechapel at the time of the murders

AMOUNT CORNWELL SPENT INVESTIGATING THE CASE

$4 million

ITEMS SHE BOUGHT

Thirty of Sickert's paintings (costing up to $70,000 each); his painting table

FORENSIC EVIDENCE

Though Cornwell took apart at least one of Sickert's paintings and searched the painting table, she found no traces of either blood, fingerprints or DNA. …

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