Magazine article Sunset

6.200 Feet and Look at the Flowers

Magazine article Sunset

6.200 Feet and Look at the Flowers

Article excerpt

Mountain gardening has its challenges difficult soils and harsh winters not the least of them. But that makes the successes even more rewarding. Eleanor NobleSwanson's garden, at an elevation of about 6,200 feet in Truckee, California, is a colorful success story. She began planting the gently sloping 1-acre hillside behind her house more than 20 years ago. Since then, she's removed enough rocks for three walls, added tons of homemade compost to the soil, faithfully mulched each winter, and experimented with almost any plant she could get her hands on. The result is nonstop flower color from spring to fall. In the center of the garden, edged by flower beds that taper off into the surrounding woodland, is a thick, meadowlike lawn -but it isn't grass. Instead, ground ivy (Glechoma hederacea) was planted from transplants, then overseeded with white clover (Trifolium repens). The result is a lush carpet that needs less care than a regular lawn, although it does get regular watering and mowing. Filling in the gap beneath the lawn's upper border and the house's raised deck is common hop (Humulus lupulus), an incredibly fast-growing vine that twines up wires run from the ground to the deck. Plants die to the ground each winter but climb back to the top of the deck by midsummer. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.