Magazine article Editor & Publisher

Farewell to 'The Doll'

Magazine article Editor & Publisher

Farewell to 'The Doll'

Article excerpt

Publisher, designer, journalist, and advocate for a free press, Carlos CastaNeda transformed the hemisphere's newspapers

When Carlos CastaNeda arrived at The Miami Herald in 1998 to revive its Spanish-language El Nuevo Herald, he took one look at that day's paper and told a colleague: "No South American is going to read this." So he set to work creating, as Miami Herald Publisher Alberto IbargUen put it the other day, "a Latin American newspaper that happens to be edited in this North American country."

One indication of CastaNeda's newspaper genius is that the El Nuevo Herald he reinvented seems as much a home-grown part of Miami's pastel landscape as the Art Deco hotels along Ocean Drive in South Beach or the flamingos late of Hialeah Park. Yet, the paper also proved so appealing to Latin residents and visitors as a stand-alone daily that it quickly became the fastest-growing newspaper in the Knight Ridder chain.

Carlos Mauricio CastaNeda Angulo died Oct. 10 at age 70 from an aggressive form of leukemia while vacationing in Lisbon, Portugal. He was an extraordinarily talented newspaperman who will be missed for the many ways he advanced the industry and the free press: as a publisher, editor, designer, mentor, reporter, and human-rights advocate.

CastaNeda moved between the newspaper industry's church and state as naturally as a Medici pope. He would be swarmed by graphic artists at meetings of the Society for News Design, by marketers at conventions of the Association of Hispanic Advertising Agencies, and by free-press activists at the Inter American Press Association. …

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