Magazine article Newsweek

Dreamscapes: After the First Schemes for the WTC Site Tanked, There Is a Bold New Set of ALTERNATIVES FOR GROUND ZERO

Magazine article Newsweek

Dreamscapes: After the First Schemes for the WTC Site Tanked, There Is a Bold New Set of ALTERNATIVES FOR GROUND ZERO

Article excerpt

Byline: Cathleen McGuigan

The weather outside was icy, but inside, 250 journalists were gathered under an incongruous umbrella of palm trees in the atrium of a Manhattan office complex to see the latest schemes for rebuilding the World Trade Center site. Last week was the first glimmer of hope that something good for the city could emerge from September 11. A year ago New York Gov. George Pataki established the Lower Manhattan Development Corporation to oversee the rebuilding. The agency has bungled the effort more than once. Last summer the public gave its first set of plans a resounding Bronx cheer, prompting the LMDC to hold an international competition for new designs. From more than 400 entries, it chose six teams of designers (a seventh firm, LMDC consultants Peterson/Littenberg, was added later). The new designs have sparked global interest, making the front pages in Europe and generating 30 million hits on the LMDC Web site in the first 36 hours.

The most futuristic aspects of the schemes are in the skyline--several call for the tallest buildings in the world. British architect Norman Foster says his firm's two towers "kiss and touch and become one"; team United offers a cluster of towers that lean into each other; the team of Richard Meier, Peter Eisenman, Charles Gwathmey and Steven Holl proposes five crisp high-rises, joined by horizontal connectors. All these links were inspired by the need to give multiple exit options. Still, the most electrifying scheme is Daniel Libeskind's poetic spiral of high-rises that ends with a jagged shaft 1,776 feet up in the sky.

But more critical--and more likely to become reality than any of these specific towers--is how the various schemes treat the street level and underground. Most, by putting rentable office space up high, were generous with parks, promenades and cultural facilities. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.