Magazine article Techniques

Career and Technology Students Doing as Well as Others: The Following Story Appeared in the San Antonio Express News on October 8, 2002. (Front and Center)

Magazine article Techniques

Career and Technology Students Doing as Well as Others: The Following Story Appeared in the San Antonio Express News on October 8, 2002. (Front and Center)

Article excerpt

Lanier High School running back Joey Rodriguez recently acquired a new talent, one that he executes with a spatula and measuring cup instead of a helmet and kneepads.

One day last week the star athlete was making chocolate mousse in his culinary arts class, and he said he may pursue a career in the kitchen if he does not make it on the football field.

He took his first culinary arts class at Lanier last year, enrolled in another this year, and cooking now ranks among his top three career choices. The military, he said, is another option.

Culinary arts is one of 18 vocational education courses offered at Lanier, a stalwart in a field that has undergone vast changes in recent years to keep up with technology and the drumbeat of higher academic standards in the classroom.

For starters, vocational education is now called career and technology. The name change is part of an effort to shed an age-old inferiority complex based on the assumption that cosmetology and auto repair are a last resort for students who do not excel academically.

"Vocational education has been the stepchild of public education,' said Orlando Lizcano, director of the program at Lanier. But now, he said, it "is not for kids who can't make it."

In fact, statewide figures show that career and technology students either do as well or slightly better than other students on the state's standardized test, known until this year as the Texas Assessment of Academic Skills.

Last spring, students who took more than one vocational education class a year had an overall passing rate on the TAAS of 88 percent, the same as their peers who did not take a career and technology class. And those enrolled in an intense vocational program known as Tech Prep nudged past the others with a passing rate of 89 percent.

Texas Education Agency dropout rates show that career and technology students also are more likely to stay in school. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.