Magazine article Clinical Psychiatry News

Three-Minute Test Can Increase Detection of Mild Cognitive Syndromes in Elderly. (Mini-Cog Study)

Magazine article Clinical Psychiatry News

Three-Minute Test Can Increase Detection of Mild Cognitive Syndromes in Elderly. (Mini-Cog Study)

Article excerpt

STOCKHOLM -- A simple 3-minute test can boost detection of mild cognitive syndromes, Dr. Soo Borson said in a poster presentation at the Eighth International Conference on Alzheimer's Disease and Related Disorders.

The most frequently used tool for cognitive screening, the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), takes about 5-12 minutes, said Dr. Borson, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at the University of Washington, Seattle. Alternatively; the Mini-Cog--a three-word recall task plus a simple clock-drawing test--has been shown to be at least as effective as the MMSE in detecting dementia in a variety of populations, including ethnically diverse ones (Int. J. Geriatr. Psychiatry 15[11]:1021-27, 2000).

In a new study the Mini-Cog outperformed physicians' judgment based on a comparison with patient records.

The findings were encouraging, but an ongoing prospective trial of the Mini-Cog is still underway and the tool will need to be tested in a variety of populations before it can be recommended for general use, Dr. Borson told this newspaper in an interview.

A group of 467 ethnically and linguistically diverse elderly subjects in the U.S. Pacific Northwest underwent a standardized dementia screening, which included the Cognitive Abilities Screening Instrument in the subject's primary language (Korean, Spanish, Filipino, a Chinese dialect, or English). …

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