Magazine article Clinical Psychiatry News

20% Dropout Rate Hinders Prolonged Therapy. (Intense Therapeutic Experience)

Magazine article Clinical Psychiatry News

20% Dropout Rate Hinders Prolonged Therapy. (Intense Therapeutic Experience)

Article excerpt

BALTIMORE - The ideal early treatment for acute stress disorder in recent trauma survivors may prove to be a "hot" cognitive therapy that combines the best of cognitive therapy with the best of prolonged exposure therapy.

Of the two treatments, prolonged exposure therapy is more effective in treating acute stress disorder, but 20% of patients find the therapeutic experience so intense that they cannot finish treatment, Richard Bryant, Ph.D., said at the annual meeting of the International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies.

In addition, another 20% of patients do not respond to this therapy within 6 months. That means that at least 40% of people with acute stress disorder are not getting the help they need, he said.

"We need to develop interventions that most people can benefit from," Dr. Bryant said. In his proposed "hot" cognitive therapy, a patient does exposure-type exercises to boost emotional processing without actual in vivo exposure to traumatic stimuli.

"It combines the best from each therapy," said Dr. Bryant, director of clinical psychology at the University of New South Wales in Sydney, Australia.

Dr. Bryant reported on an ongoing study of 40 survivors of nonsexual assault who had developed acute stress disorder and were at risk for posttraumatic stress disorder. They were randomized to prolonged exposure therapy using imagined exposure to traumatic stimuli, cognitive therapy without exposure, and supportive counseling. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.