Magazine article Clinical Psychiatry News

Social Maladjustment May Be Tied to Suicides. (Borderline Personality Disorder)

Magazine article Clinical Psychiatry News

Social Maladjustment May Be Tied to Suicides. (Borderline Personality Disorder)

Article excerpt

BETHESDA, MD.--Treatment of poor social adjustment in patients with borderline personality disorder has the potential to decrease their likelihood of attempting suicide, Dr. Paul Soloff said at a conference sponsored by the Treatment and Research Advancements National Association for Personality Disorder.

Poor social adjustment in school, at work, or in the family can be added to the list of known risk factors for suicide in these patients. Previously established risk factors include the absence of treatment, previous suicide attempts, comorbid major depression or substance abuse, lack of adequate social support, and disruptions in interpersonal relationships.

Dr. Soloff and his colleagues at the Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic in Pittsburgh prospectively followed 93 borderline inpatients and outpatients, as well as depressed patients who were not borderline, for 2 years. Most of the patients had attempted suicide at least once (86%) when the study began, and 31% reattempted suicide at least once within those first 2 years. The medical lethality of their suicide attempts did not increase.

Lower social adjustment predicted whether a patient would be a suicide attempter or a nonattempter. The investigators compared 24 borderline patients and 22 borderline patients who had comorbid major depression with 34 patients having major depression only. In both groups of patients with borderline personality disorder, patients with low social adjustment rating were 16 times more likely to attempt suicide, compared with patients in the major depression group.

In contrast, increased social adjustment led to a decrease in the number of attempts. "Social adjustment may be a protective factor in borderline patients," Dr. Soloff said at the conference, which was also sponsored by the National Institute of Mental Health and Suburban Hospital. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.