Magazine article Clinical Psychiatry News

Psychiatric Disorders Often Go Unrecognized in Epileptic Children. (Population Prone to Disorders)

Magazine article Clinical Psychiatry News

Psychiatric Disorders Often Go Unrecognized in Epileptic Children. (Population Prone to Disorders)

Article excerpt

SEATTLE -- Clinicians who care for children with epilepsy need to be more aware that these children are prone to psychiatric problems, Dr. Rochelle Caplan said at the annual meeting of the American Epilepsy Society.

In a study of 114 children with complex partial seizures or primary generalized epilepsy 60% should have received a psychiatric diagnosis, but only 33% of those children ever received any recognition of or treatment for their psychiatric needs. "We think these children should be getting treatment," said Dr. Caplan, a professor of psychiatry at the University of California, Los Angeles.

There was an association with unrecognized depression and the patient being on single-drug therapy.

A previous study conducted by Dr. Caplan's group identified a relationship between a patient having a psychiatric problem and greater IQ and/or less seizure control.

In the present study those with an IQ of 98 or greater had more risk of having an unrecognized psychiatric problem than those with an IQ of 89 or less. …

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