Magazine article Geographical

Cites Loosens Grip on Ivory. (Southern Africa)

Magazine article Geographical

Cites Loosens Grip on Ivory. (Southern Africa)

Article excerpt

SOUTHERN AFRICA The 13-year ban on ivory trading has been partially lifted following the decision by the UN Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) to allow South Africa, Botswana and Namibia to sell 60 tonnes of stockpiled elephant tusks. The three nations argued that the embargoed ivory, thought to be worth about 3.1 million [pounds sterling], constitutes an immense waste of resources that could be used to fund both conservation and development projects.

"These are the people who have to deal with the effects of living with elephants after all," said Anthony Field of WWF. As yet it's unclear whether legislation will be put in place to ensure that the profits from the sales are invested in conservation and development. Lobbying by environmental groups led to the voluntary withdrawal of proposed annual quotas for ivory trading in favour of this decision, which provides for greater scrutiny. The commission ruled that while sales could begin as early as May 2004, they will only take place if CITES is satisfied that controls have been implemented. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.