Magazine article The American Enterprise

Not So Simple. (Scan)

Magazine article The American Enterprise

Not So Simple. (Scan)

Article excerpt

A note to liberals who used the Trent Lott episode to sling racial recriminations: While recent census results show that racial segregation has declined in almost every corner of the nation, it is in liberal Northern cities that segregation is proving most stubborn. According to a new census report entitled "Racial and Ethnic Residential Segregation in the United States: 1980-2000" the top ten most segregated metro areas in 2000 are, in order, Milwaukee, Detroit, Cleveland, St. Louis, Newark, Cincinnati, Buffalo, New York, Chicago, and Philadelphia.

Note that not one of these cities is in the South. All of them were carried by Al Gore in the 2000 election, and seven are in states that he carried. Two of the most segregated cities in the country are in the backyard of Hillary Clinton, one of the most self-righteous critics of Lott. By contrast, the five least segregated places in the country are Orange County, San Jose, Norfolk, Tampa, and San Diego--pretty strong GOP country.

Anti-black racism is probably still a factor in residential segregation. But much less than ever before. Polls show that hardly any whites now object to having a black neighbor of the same social class.

There are numerous reasons why segregation is more widespread in the Northeast. One explanation is that self-segregation now appeals to growing segments of educated blacks and Hispanics, many of whom have abandoned integration in favor of promoting racial pride and "community empowerment." This is manifested in places like Maryland's Prince George's County, where affluent blacks voted to re-segregate the county's schools three years ago. …

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