Magazine article Management Services

The Unorganised Manager

Magazine article Management Services

The Unorganised Manager

Article excerpt

John Cleese recreates one of his most celebrated roles - St Peter guarding the Pearly Gates - in Video Arts new 1996 version of the first two parts of The Unorganised Manager. The award winning series of programmes, first released in 1983, have long been regarded as the definitive training programmes on the skills of time management and delegation. The new versions of The Unorganised Manager parts 1 and 2 are set in today's high pressure work environment. Contemporary managers may work with laptop computers, fax machines, e-mail and mobile phones, but, as the programmes demonstrate, all the benefits of modern technology are dissipated if their users have not learnt to organise themselves and others effectively. In the programme, Richard Lewis, played by Nigel Lindsay, is the personification of the unorganised manager. A typical hardworking, harassed executive in the catering industry - in every way a suitable case for a coronary. Lewis is responsible for several district managers. Despite his mountainous in-tray, heavily overbooked diary, and loads of after-hours work he does not allow responsibility to get in the way of his good will. His is an ever open door. He is always willing to help solve everyone else's problems - be they large or small.

He sees himself as helpful and hard working. But, he is deluding himself. All becomes apparent when he suffers a coronary and finds himself face to face with St Peter who is reluctant to let him enter the Pearly Gates. St Peter sees things differently from a disbelieving Lewis. Like most sinners explains St Peter he is a man who did evil when he believed he was doing right.

You cannot organise other people 'till you can organise yourself, says the Saint. In a series of replays from The Hereafter, St Peter reveals to Lewis - the unorganised manager - where he had gone wrong. …

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