Magazine article Work & Family Life

New Information about 'Risky Drinking'

Magazine article Work & Family Life

New Information about 'Risky Drinking'

Article excerpt

We associate alcohol problems with heavy drinking, but "risky" alcohol use is much more common than alcoholism, says Richard Saitz, M.D., of the Clinical Addiction Research and Education Unit at the Boston University Medical Center.

Dr. Saitz defines risky drinking as more than seven drinks a week or three drinks per occasion for women and adults over 65. These amounts exceed the level considered healthy for cholesterol. "You're not a bad person for drinking that amount," he says, "but you're putting yourself at risk." (The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism defines one drink as a 12-ounce beer, a 5-ounce glass of wine, or 1.5 ounces of distilled spirits.)

Robert Millman, M.D., of the alcohol and drug abuse service at the Weill Cornell Medical Center, says that "unhealthy use" depends on the individual. But "putting out numbers like seven drinks a week is useful," he says. "There's lot of denial of alcohol abuse."

The risks for women are greater than for men. Because women generally weigh less, the same amount of alcohol becomes more concentrated. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.