Magazine article Black Issues in Higher Education

N.C. A&T Remembers 'Greensboro Four' with New Statue

Magazine article Black Issues in Higher Education

N.C. A&T Remembers 'Greensboro Four' with New Statue

Article excerpt

GREENSBORO, N.C.

Four Black college freshmen who inspired sit-in movements across the South when they ordered food from a segregated lunch counter have been immortalized with a statue.

Leaders from North Carolina A&T State University unveiled a 10-foot statue of the men, who have become known as the "Greensboro Four."

Jibreel Khazan, Franklin McCain, Joseph McNeil and the late David Richmond helped launch a decade of civil rights protest when they ordered food and sat down with it Feb. 1, 1960, at the downtown Woolworth's department store. At the time, the department store allowed Blacks to eat only at a standup counter.

"Great people don't always know that what they are doing at the time will later be perceived as something great," says McNeil's son, Ron McNeil. "They weren't great at the time, but they had courage."

The statue depicting the four men was unveiled Feb. 1 outside the university's Dudley Memorial Building. The unveiling was part of a daylong celebration to honor the 42nd anniversary of the sit-in.

A&T also honored civil rights leaders Dr. Vincent Harding and Rosemarie Freeney-- Harding with the university's annual human rights medal.

Harding, a religion and social transformation professor at the University of Denver, and his wife were recognized for their work in the Southern Freedom movement. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.