Magazine article The Spectator

Ancient & Modern

Magazine article The Spectator

Ancient & Modern

Article excerpt

GREEK archaeologists have found Aristotle's Lyceum (Latinised spelling of Greek Lukeion, so called because it was built in a sanctuary to Apollon Lukeios, 'of the wolf, one of Apollo's many epithets).

The Lyceum had been a popular public meeting place long before Aristotle became associated with it. Education and pederastic culture were closely connected in ancient Athens, and the gymnasium at the Lyceum, where young men trained naked, also attracted older men to give them the benefit of their insights. Famous intellectuals used it to give lectures. Socrates frequented it regularly. The number of places for a walk (peripatos) in the area gave the name 'peripatetic' to the type of philosophy Aristotle practised there.

Aristotle, born in 384 BC in Stagira (northern Greece), studied under Plato at his Academy in Athens for 20 years and was tutor to Alexander the Great for seven before founding his 'school' at the Lyceum in 335 BC. …

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