Magazine article Management Services

Women with Children Working Longer Hours

Magazine article Management Services

Women with Children Working Longer Hours

Article excerpt

Newsdesk

Women with children are working longer hours than in the early 1990s and express growing dissatisfaction with the hours that they are working. Meanwhile, nearly half of all women employees still say that they work out of financial necessity and this group works longer hours than women who have other main reasons for working.

The findings from a national survey of employees in 2000/01, funded by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) as part of its 4 million research programme into the future of work, will be significant for the government's initiatives to promote equal opportunities and worklife balance.

Women with children under 16 still work below average hours but the influence of the factor with dependent children is weakening. Although the increase in their hours relative to women without children could be seen as part of an emancipation of women from the demand of childcare, the change has actually been accompanied by a sharp fall in the satisfaction of women with their working hours. In 1992, 51% of women were either `completely satisfied' or 'very satisfied' with their working hours but by 2000 this had fallen to only 29%.

The survey, which covered 1,100 women in a representative range of occupations, established that women with a dependent child were working about two and a half hours more per week, relative to a woman without a child, than in the early 1990s, although still working fewer hours than similar women without a child. The biggest change in women's hours has come for those whose youngest child is between 12 and 15 ( secondary school age). …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.