Magazine article The Crisis

NAACP Law Fellow Program Trains Students in Civil Rights Law

Magazine article The Crisis

NAACP Law Fellow Program Trains Students in Civil Rights Law

Article excerpt

The Impact that NAACP lawyers have had on the nation's racial progress is undeniable. Lawyers such as Thurgood Marshall, Robert L. Carter and Constance Baker Motley used their legal knowledge to challenge America's unjust system of segregation and ultimately to change the American landscape.

Today the NAACP's Law Fellow Program continues that tradition. The program was created three years ago to give students who have completed at least one year of law school the opportunity to work for the summer at the NAACP headquarters in Baltimore and the Washington, D.C., Bureau.

"So many young people don't know about the civil rights struggle and we wanted to bring in students who wanted to be young leaders, if not at least plant the seed into them to become successful lawyers and provide them with the resources and networking opportunities necessary that will help them to give back to their communities," says Angela Ciccolo, a deputy general counsel with the NAACP, who helped establish the law fellows program.

The law fellows program is funded by Kellogg's Corporate Citizenship fund, the philanthropic arm of the Kellogg Company, which has supported the program since its inception. The company provides $75,000 each year to support the law fellowship and other student expenses.

"The program was the idea of the NAACP to give law students the opportunity to work in civil rights," says Tim Knowlton, vice president of corporate social responsibility for the Kellogg Company, which received the Corporate Trailblazer Award during the NAACP's annual convention. …

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